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  1. #1
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    Lightbulb Best Paint Sealant

    I'd like to offer a paint sealant like the new car dealers sell.

    1. Price point (give a range so we don't violate any laws)

    2. Best product?

    3. Application method?

    4. Warranty?

    5. Reapplication language?

    TIA/Waxman
    "Kugelis Capitalist"

  2. #2
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    Default

    With economy the way it is dealers are having a hard time convincing customers to buy a paint sealant deal. They are overpriced and if you read the fine print they really aren't much of a warrantee. There are some large loopholes. Most simply say if the finish looks dull they will reapply another coat and require additional treatments to keep the warrantee in force. The paint sealant programs offered by polish manufacturers are about the same thing. Some offer the ability to get your money back if the finish does not remain in good condition. In addition, you pay a premium for the product that is nothing more than their normal sealant with a warantee.

    If you are interested in offering some type of appearance package program why not consider an annual plan where the customer receives a complete detail, several car washes and a follow up hand or orbital wax during the year.
    All car washes are the same - they are different!

  3. #3
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    Default

    There are several products that you can consider.

    I found Optimum Opti-Coat 2.0 to be an excellent paint sealant.

    2.0 is a clearcoat polymer that forms a permanent bond with the paint. Once it cures, it can only be removed with compound and buffer or wet sanding, solvents won’t work.

    However, it does require some preparation; remove wax then clay bar followed by washing with general purpose to remove silicone from clay bar treatment.

    I also like Simoniz 365 wax/sealant. I found that it holds up for about six months. However, I’m not sure if it is still available because Simoniz is now marketing to car dealers a product that is very similar to Opti-Coat.

    Broadway Equipment Company also has an excellent sealant that is offered in the company’s Auto Butler program. However, I’m not sure it is available unless you are a car dealer.

    As for new car dealerships, you may be surprised to find many more of them are turning up the wick by adding express oil change and carwash systems to their businesses to boost their customer service index and keep their customers from straying.

    As for a paint maintenance program, it may sound like a good idea but most carwash operations cannot match the perceived level of trust of a licensed new car dealership. This is especially so with legacy customers.

    My advice is to find a product that you are comfortable working with and consider a price that is about 1/3 of what local dealerships charge.

  4. #4
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    Default

    Dealer paint sealants are nothing special. Choosing the right product will depend on what types of vehicles you will be servicing and how often. 1st off, no sealant is worthy of it's warranty. It's usually just marketing hype coupled with an abandonment of warranty. Warranties are usually a waste of paper.

    Quote Originally Posted by Waxman View Post
    I'd like to offer a paint sealant like the new car dealers sell.

    1. Price point (give a range so we don't violate any laws)
    Not sure what laws you'd be violating?? Please explain

    2. Best product?
    Very subjective. Most will only bead for about 6 months. Less when exposed to harsh chemicals.

    3. Application method?
    Most are wipe on, wipe off.

    4. Warranty?
    I'd self insure it to save money. Warranties are expensive.

    5. Reapplication language?
    You're getting into the trick bag with that one.

    TIA/Waxman
    I'd try these 3 products:

    Zaino Z2 (very durable and unique looks): http://www.zainostore.com/Merchant2/...roduct_Count=8


    HD Nitro Seal (pricy, but incredible looks): http://www.3dproducts.com/HD-Nitro-Seal.html

    I've actually love the HD Nitro Seal product. It's a 2 part system where the 2nd layer (part B) bonds to the 1st one (part A). Here's pictures and videos of a few vehicles I've applied it to: http://www.autopia.org/forum/car-det...-w-part-b.html

    HD POXY:(very economical) http://www.autopia-store.org/HD-Poxy.html

    Then, there's a very unique product that isn't a wax or a sealant. It's the newest paint protection technology called a paint coating named Optimum Opti-Coat. It's a permanant coating that is similar to clear coat paint that beads water like crazy. It also offers scratch resistancy from normal washing. The product is incredible to say the least, but requires high levels of skill to work with. You need to apply it to paint that is as perfect as possible or else you're in for a treat of removing it.

    Here's a 2 year study I did on the product where I used nothing but Dawn dish washing detergent and touchless car washes. Needless to say, the product was like new 2 years later:

    http://www.autopia.org/forum/car-det...st-review.html

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to Pro-Techt For This Useful Post:

    Robert Bailey (04-08-2013)

  6. #5
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    Default

    Waxman,

    You will find benefit in offering customers a quality product with a guarantee. New car dealers make lots of money by doing so and manage to keep a great number of their customers a long time, sometimes generations. This cannot be said for many detailers.

    As for products mentioned by the Autopia person, I cannot disagree.

    However, as you probably know, many folks who frequent Autopia are enthusiasts/car nuts (DIY), not the typical carwash customer (DIFM).

    The difference in the purchasing behavior of DIY and DIFM is distinct.

    As a motorhead and former compulsive perfectionist, I can assure you as I have aged my desire and willingness to wash and wax my own vehicles continues to deteriorate significantly, I’d rather go play golf.

    Arguably, there is some portion of 70 million baby-boomers who share my characteristics.

    If you are going to stay in the game, I suggest you stay your course.

    As for Opti 2.0, it doesn’t require any special skills, just thoroughness in following instructions.

    Of course, this is something that many motorists neither have inclination or time for.

  7. #6
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    Default

    For anyone interested, if you contact me privately I will send you an article that I wrote on Paint Sealants & Waxes with contributions from chemists of two leading detail chemical companies. It generically discusses what a wax is and what a paint sealant is, how they are formulated and what the differences are.

    It makes no reference to brand or which is better just a basic ingredient discussion of what is the various products.

    They are different based on what the formulator is trying to accomplish, for example:

    +Ease of application
    +Ease of removal
    +Reflective shine
    +Resistence to shampoos
    +Depth of shine
    +Durability

    No one product, wax or sealant, can be all things. You enhance one feature and it takes away from another.

    For example, a product that has a high shine will typically be less durable because the ingredients tha enhance shine are not particularly durable. In a study we had commissioned the two products that were #1 and #2 in increase in reflective shine before and after application were #18 & #19 (out of 25) in resistence to salt water corrosion (preventing rust).

    There are sealant products available to detailers from the legitimate detail chemical companies that are far better and less expensive than the sealants that auto dealers are buying from the "protection companies," who in almost all cases do not even make their product. They buy from a private label chemical company and "razzle-dazzle" the dealer with warranties and certificates, etc. etc that allows the dealer to sell to the customer for $500 to $1000. The protection company sells two ounces of product for as high as $90.

    But, the customer wants the security of taking care of their "new" car and it is easy for the F & I manager to sell it on a new car purchase because, "gosh Mr Jones it will only be another $2.00 a month on your new car sales contract.

    Regards
    Bud Abraham
    DETAIL PLUS SYSTEMS

  8. #7
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    Default It goes way beyond following instructions...

    Quote Originally Posted by robert roman View Post
    As for Opti 2.0, it doesn’t require any special skills, just thoroughness in following instructions.

    Yes, the physical labor of applying the coating is about as easy as it gets. You basically wipe on a very thin film over the vehicle panel by panel, watching for and leveling any high spots or smears/streaks and you’re done. But the directions say very little about applying this product to paint not in the proper condition and hazards of doing so if you need to remove it. The original Pro version was actually only sold to qualified professionals. The biggest concern any person that applies this product should have is not only qualifying the surface, but the customer. They need to not be fully instructed that this is a permanent layer and one that should be applied to surfaces that are as defect free as possible or to their liking. I’ve heard horror stories about inexperienced people (both pro detailers and DIY’rs) putting this product on paint that they felt was “good enough”, but unfortunately when the client picked up the vehicle upon completition it was less then their expectations. They were now faced with a very serious predicament of removing the coating that ends up exposing them to far great threats then prior to starting the job.

    Try keeping in mind that this product can have a dual propose selling point too. One, that you’re offering a product that is basically bulletproof which allows one to charge a premium for it accordingly, and second being the up-sell to the customer for high end correction of their paint prior to the application. The second one however may not be realistic undertaking for most car washes and basic detail centers. Mainly because they have very little experience properly correcting paint in the 1st place. The majority use polishing compounds loaded with cheap fillers that end up either being removed during the paint preparation step of the coating application(showing the true condition of the paint) or do not allow the coating to bond with the surface. If this is a viable undertaking for someone, then by all means move forward with the venture.

  9. #8
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    Default

    Not interested in this type coating, as it reminds me of Blue Coral's 'Touchless One Step Acrylic', popular 15 years ago.

    A sealant should be something that can wear off, IMO. That may sound contradictory in nature, but I don't care.

    I appreciate the input, but am in no way interested in smearing a pseudo-clear coat on a paint job.
    "Kugelis Capitalist"

  10. #9
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    Default

    I am not familiar with the product Pro Techt is talking about but I am very familiar with the Blue Coral product Waxman mentions. It was a real nightmare and only was on the market for about a year. The problem was that it was supposed to restore finishes as well as protect them. It did neither and was almost impossible to remove. It was actually a form of an acrylic floor coating. The real problem was that the guarantee only offered to repay the cost of the product which was relatively inexpensive. I heard of many nightmare stories where it cost customers hundreds to have the product removed if if could be done at all. It would be very careful with any product that offers such a permanent coating.
    All car washes are the same - they are different!

 

 

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